Body Language As A Tag

Body Language as a TAG

  1. Use body language to add depth to dialog.
  2. Use it because more than 50% of human communication is non-verbal.
  3. Use it to show how your character’s emotions affect his or her actions.
  4. Use it to help you show rather than tell your reader everything.
  5. Use it in moderation. If overused, it can slow your story down.

A few ideas from writerswrite.co.za:

Anger or aggression: shake fist, point finger, stab finger, slam fist on a table, flushed face, throbbing veins in neck, jutting chin, clench fists, clench jaw, lower eyebrows, squint eyes, bare teeth, a wide stance, tight-lipped smile.

Boredom: yawn, avoid eye contact, tap feet, twirl a pen, doodle, fidget, slouch.

Confusion: tilt head, narrow eyes, furrowed brow, shrug.

Defensive: cross arms or legs, arms out with palms forward, hands up, place anything in front of body, hands in pockets.

Embarrassment: blush, stammer, cover face with hands, bow head, trouble maintaining eye contact, look down and away, blink back tears.

Fear: hunch shoulders, shrink back, mouth open, widen eyes, shake, tremble, freeze, rock from side to side, wrap arms around self, shaky hands.

Jealousy: tight lips, sour expression, narrow eyes, crossed arms.

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Deep POV Characters

 

This is a technique that draws us in, so that as the reader we feel one with the POV character. It is as if you are that person. Authors like Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven King), Suzanne Collins (Hunger Games), and Cassandra Clare (Shadowhunters) use this technique effectively.

It is best used in novels that seek to thrill the reader or take them on an emotional journey. It is a technique that cannot be perfected overnight.

The Basics:

Limit your character’s knowledge and only reveal the things your character actually knows to keep readers engaged. Cut our filter words like “thought, wondered, or saw.” Just state it, e.g. She wondered how bad the tornado had been. VS. How bad had it been?

Limit your dialog tags. Use attribute tags instead, e.g. “Are you okay?” she asked. VS.  Are you okay?” She reached for his hand, but he pulled it away.

Employ the ultimate show, and don’t tell. Deep POV is all about getting into your character’s head, so avoid as many instances of telling as possible.

Don’t use the passive voice. No action should be done unto someone. Someone should always do it., e.g. Her shoulder was hit. VS. He hit her shoulder.

Be careful when identifying characters. In Deep POV, your character relationships aren’t easy. Use dialog when possible, e.g. Not “John, her brother, stood next to her” but “John stood next to her.” Or “Eric, this is my brother John.”

Relate backstory with memory flashes.

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August Program – Deep Point of View and Layering

The August program will be on Deep Point of View, Layering and How they are Co-Dependent.
Speaker:

Anna Jeffrey writes steamy, yet heart-warming books. Dixie Cash, on the other hand, will keep you laughing.

 

Anna Jeffrey is an award-winning author of romance novels as well as romantic comedy/mystery. She has written 10 romance novels and co-authored 7 as USA Today Bestselling author, Dixie Cash. Her most recent book is “The Cattleman.”

Her Anna Jeffrey’s books have won the Write Touch Readers’ Award, the Aspen Gold, and the More Than Magic awards. Her books have been finalists in the Colorado Romance Writers award, the Golden Quill and Southern Magic as well as the Write Touch Readers’ Award, the Aspen Gold and the More than Magic awards. She is a member of Romance Writers of America.

Anna is a fifth generation Texan. She was born and grew up in West Texas, where most of her family members were farmers and ranchers or worked in the oil fields. She left Texas for many years and lived in four of the western states, a rich experience she’ll never forget.

She loves most things western, from the customs and culture to the philosophy of life. She enjoys many hobbies, i.e., reading, painting and drawing, crafting, needlework and beading.

These days, she’s back home in Texas. She and her husband currently live in a small town not far from the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex.

Tips on Book Cover and Graphic Designs

Monday night 7pm at Lakestone Terrace 3rd floor game room, should be one of those programs you aren’t sure you need until you need it and then it’s too late to learn all you need to know fast. Book Covers are the second most important thing about publishing a great book. The first is writing a great book. Join the Writers Bloc Monday, June26, 2017 as graphic designer, Steve Torres, shares the importance of excellence in design.

Amanda Arista Presenting “Getting the Words Right”

Getting the Words Right”

Why am I writing this? How does it serve my story? Is this the best way to say it

Amanda Arista – Author and teacher with SMU’s Writers Path – Originally from Illinois, Amanda now lives in Dallas with her husband and daughter. Published author and instructor with the SMU Writers Path, she likes to be known as the character lady who prefers demons and witchcraft to slasher films.

“The World of Publishing Today”  Marketing & Where do I fit in?

Lena Nelson Dooley – Award Winning Author – Award-winning author, Lena has sold more than 850,000 copies of her books. As a member of the American Christian Fiction Writers and the Christian Author’s Network, Lena loves mentoring budding authors.

Writers’ Workshop 2017

Morning Session:

Getting the Words Right”

Why am I writing this? How does it serve my story? Is this the best way to say it

Amanda Arista – Author and teacher with SMU’s Writers Path – Originally from Illinois, Amanda now lives in Dallas with her husband and daughter. Published author and instructor with the SMU Writers Path, she likes to be known as the character lady who prefers demons and witchcraft to slasher films.

Afternoon Session:

“The World of Publishing Today”  Marketing & Where do I fit in?

Lena Nelson Dooley – Award Winning Author – Award-winning author, Lena has sold more than 850,000 copies of her books. As a member of the American Christian Fiction Writers and the Christian Author’s Network, Lena loves mentoring budding authors.

Award Winning Author Shares Writing Knowledge

Author Christine Kohler will show how to turn life experiences into publishable stories at the Granbury Writers’ Bloc at 7 p.m. April 24 at Lakestone Terrace . 916 Highway 377 on the 3rd floor

Critique is at 5 p.m. and ends at 6:45 before the 7pm program.

Christine Kohler is a graduate of the University of Hawaii, and lived in Japan and Guam, the setting for her debut novel NO SURRENDER SOLDIER (Merit Press, Simon & Schuster). She worked as a foreign correspondent covering the West Pacific for Gannett. She was an editor and copy editor for the San Antonio Express-News. Kohler also worked as a media specialist, middleand high school teacher, and writing instructor for the Institute of Children’s Literature. She has 17 children’s books published in trade, mass, educational, and library markets.

Writers’ workshop and writing group